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Aboriginaalitaidetta

Suomi-Australia -yhdistysten Liitosta voi nyt hankkia alkuperäisiä aboriginaalitaiteilijoiden maalauksia. Jäsenmaksunsa maksaneet Australia -yhdistysten jäsenet saavat valitsemansa taulun jäsenalennuksella. Hinnat ovat kohtuulliset 150 - 350 €. Hintaan sisältyy myös maalaukseen liittyvä tarina ja aitoustodistus, jossa on tiedot taiteilijasta kuvan kera. Moderniinkin sisustukseen sopivat maalaukset ovat kauniita ja värikkäitä ja ne sisältävät paljon symboliikkaa. Maalauksiin sisältyvät erikoiset tarinat ovat usein monimutkaisia ja ne liittyvät useimmiten aboriginaaleille ominaiseen unimaailmaan, sekä kunkin suvun tai alueen omiin seremonioihin ja tarinoihin. Ohessa on esitelty osa tämänhetkisestä tauluvalikoimasta. Esitetyt hinnat ovat jäsenhintoja, muille on eri hinnasto. Tauluista kiinnostuneet voivat ottaa yhteyttä toiminnanjohtajaan sähköpostitse tai puhelimitse.

No: 1880/18
Wanakiji Jukurrpa (Bush Tomato Dreaming)
Koko: 46 x 46 cm
Jäsenhinta 255 €
Taiteilija:
Melissa Napangardi Williams

The Wanakiji Jukurrpa (bush tomato [Solanum chippendalei] Dreaming) travels through Yaturlu (near Mount Theo, north of Yuendumu). “Wanakiji” grows in open spinifex country and is a small, prickly plant with purple flowers that bears green fleshy fruit with many small black seeds. After collecting the fruit the seeds are removed with a small wooden spoon called ‘kajalarra’. The fruit then can be eaten raw or threaded onto skewers called ‘turlturrpa’ and then cooked over a fire. ‘Wanakiji’ can also be skewered and left to dry. When they are prepared in this way it is called ‘turlturrpa’ and the fruit can be kept for a long time. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. The Wanakiji Jukurrpa belongs to Napanangka/Napangardi women and Japanangka/Japangardi men.


No: 2618/18ny
Lukarrara Jukurrpa (Desert Fringe-rush Seed Dreaming)
Koko: 61 x 46 cm
Jäsenhinta 265 €
Taiteilija:
Alana Nakamarra Gibson

 

This Jukurrpa belongs to women of the Nakamarra/Napurrurla subsections and to Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This Dreaming is associated with a place called Jaralypari, north of Yuendumu. Lukarrara (desert fringe-rush [Fimbristylis oxystachya & Fimbristylis eremophila]) is a grass with an edible seed. The seeds are traditionally ground on a large stone (‘ngatinyanu’) with a smaller stone (‘ngalikirri’) to make flour. This flour is mixed with water (‘ngapa’) to make damper cakes which are cooked and eaten. In Warlpiri traditional paintings iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. Large concentric circles often represent the site of Jaralypari and also the seed bearing grass Lukurrara. ‘U’ shapes can depict the Karnta (women) collecting ‘lukarrara’ and straight lines are frequently used to portray seeds that fall down to the ground and are also collected by women using their ‘parrajas’ (wooden food carriers) and ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks).


No: 2614/18ny
Jinti-parnta Jukurrpa (Edible Fungus Dreaming ) – Mina Mina
Koko: 30 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Tina Napangardi Martin

 

In this painting women of the Napanangka and Napangardi subsection are collecting ‘jinti-parnta’ (edible fungus [Elderia arenivaga]) far to the west of Yuendumu at Karnta Karlangu, near to another place called Mina Mina. ‘Jinti-parnta’ is also known as native truffle and appears in the sandhills after the winter rains. The growing fungus forces the earth above it to crack, exposing it. Then, women collect it, squeezing out the juicie before cooking. Jinti-parnta is prepared by cooking in hot ashes. Ancestral women travelled north through Janyinki and other places, then to the east through to Alcoota country, while collecting ‘jinti-parnta’. They got to Mina Mina, which is a ceremonial place belonging to Japanangka/ Japangardi men and Napanangka/Napangardi women. Their associated land continues far to the west of Yuendumu into sand hill country. There are a number of ‘mulju’ (water soakages) and a large clay pan at Mina Mina and it is at these sites that the women danced and performed ceremonies. As a result ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks) rose up out of the ground, which the women carried with them on their long journey east. They danced and sang the whole way with no sleep. The women collected other types of bush tucker as ‘yakajirri’ (bush sultana). In the paintings of this Dreaming concentric circles are often used to represent the jinti-parnta that the women have collected.


No: 2583/18ny
Watiya-warnu Jukurrpa (Seed Dreaming)
Koko: 30 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Angela Nangala Robertson

 

This painting tells the story of a Jangala ‘watiya-warnu’ (Acacia tenuissima) ancestor who travelled south from a small hill called Ngurlupurranyangu to Yamunturrngu (Mount Liebig). As he travelled he picked the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds and placed them in ‘parrajas’ (food carriers), one of which he carried on his head. Watiya-warnu is a seed bearing tree that grows in open spinifex or mulga country. When people returned to their camp after collecting the seeds they would make large windbreaks for shelter and winnow the seed in the late afternoon. Immature ‘watiya-warnu’ seed is ground into a paste and can be used to treat upset stomachs. The associated ‘watiya-warnu’ ceremony involves the preparation of a large ground painting. This Jukurrpa belongs to Nampijinpa/Nangala women and Jampijinpa/Jangala men. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. In paintings of this Dreaming ‘U’ shapes are often depicting women collecting the ‘watiya-warnu’ seeds. Oval shapes represent the ‘parrajas’ where they carry the seeds and strait lines beside them frequently portrait digging sticks.


No: 4233/18
Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) – Puyurru
Koko: 30 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Sarah Napurrurla Leo

 

The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The ‘kirda’ (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations.


No: 4052/18
Ngalyipi Jukurrpa (Snake Vine Dreaming) – Yanjirlpiri
Koko: 46 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Geraldine Napangardi Granites

 

‘Ngalyipi’ (snakevine) is a green creeper that climbs up the trunks and branches of trees and shrubs. The plant is found on sandy spinifex plains and sandhills. ‘Ngalyipi’ is frequently depicted in paintings due to its many uses and its great ceremonial importance. The vine can be used as a shoulder strap to carry ‘parraja’ (coolamons) and ‘ngami’ (water carriers). The plant also has medicinal uses; its vines are used as tourniquets, and its leaves and vines are used as bandages for wounds. Warlpiri sometimes also chew the leaves to treat severe colds. ‘Ngalyipi’ stems can be pounded between stones and tied around the forehead to cure headaches. In men’s initiation, ‘ngalyipi’ is used to tie the ‘witi’ (ceremonial poles) to the shins of the dancing initiates, and to tie ‘yukurruyukurru’ (dancing boards) to dancers’ bodies. The initiation ceremonies associated with the ‘ngalyipi’ Dreaming at Yanjirlpiri are for the sons and grandsons of Japaljarri and Jungarrayi men. Napaljarri and Nungarrayi women dance at these ceremonies, and then look away and block their ears when the men dance. This ‘witi’ ceremony is performed at night under the stars.


No: 434/18
Wardapi Jukurrpa (Goanna Dreaming) – Yarripurlangu
Koko: 46 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Rahab Nungarrayi Spencer

 

This Wardapi Jukurrpa (goanna [Varanus gouldii] Dreaming) comes from Yarripilangku, south-west of Yuendumu. It tells the story of a group of Karnta (Warlpiri women) that were sitting down in a circle. A man from Mt. Theo, of the Japangardi skin group named Wamaru, came up to the women. He wanted to take a girl of the wrong skin, a Nungarrayi. He took the Nungarrayi woman, named Yurlkurinyi, and went up the hill where they made love. Then the earth turned to Ngunjungunju (yellow and white ochre) and the man turned himself and all the ‘karnta’ (women) into ‘wardapi’ (goannas). The ochre is still found on top of the hill and is used today for love magic and for ceremonial decoration. This Jukurrpa belongs to the Napaljarri/Japaljarri and Nungarrayi/Jungarrayi subsections. It also belongs to people from Mt Theo of the Japanangka/Napanangka, Japangardi/Napangardi subsections. In paintings of this Jukurrpa, the group of women is often represented by concentric circles and ‘U’ shapes typically are used to represent women. Concentric circles can also illustrate ‘wardapi’ holes and the droppings they leave while ‘wardapi’ tracks are usually represented by ‘W’ shapes.


No: 2810/18
Yuparli Jukurrpa (Bush Banana Dreaming)
Koko: 46 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Renita Napangardi Brown

 

The Yuparli Jukurrpa (bush banana [Leichhardtia australis] Dreaming) is the story of a fruit bearing creeper that grows up trees and produces fruit with many fine, winged seeds inside. ‘Yapa’ (Warlpiri people) like to cook them in the coals, particularly the young juicy ones that we call Yangardurrku. ‘Yapa’ also eat the small white flowers and the leaves, which have a delicious nutty taste. One story for this Jukurrpa is of two ancestral ‘karnta’ (women) of the Napangardi and Napanangka skin groups who travelled south from Pikilyi (Vaughan Springs, west of Yuendumu) through country near Karrinyarra (Mount Wedge) to the south and re-emerged at two ‘mulju’ soakages) at Yinjirimardi, west of Yuendumu. They were accompanied by a man of the Japangardi skin group. He would sometimes change himself into a ‘warlawurru’ (wedge-tailed eagle) and fly behind them. Unknown to the Napangardi women, her Japangardi classificatory brother and the Napanangka were lovers. They travelled further north and returned to Pikilyi where they entered the ground, creating the large freshwater springs that are still there today. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and other elements. A variety of images and signs are used to depict the various elements of this story.


No: 4942/18
Pamapardu Jukurrpa (Flying Ant Dreaming) – Warntungurru
Koko: 30 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Maria Nampijinpa Brown

 

This painting depicts the Pamapardu Jukurrpa (Flying Ant Dreaming) from Wapurtali, west of Yuendumu. ‘Pamapardu’ is the Warlpiri name for the flying ants or termites that build the large anthills found throughout Warlpiri country. This country belongs to Nakamarra/Napurrurla women and Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. ‘Pamapardu’ are flying ants. They build earth mounds (‘mingkirri’) that are common in the Tanami area. When heavy rains come in summer the ‘mingkirri’ get flooded out, so the ‘pamapardu’ grow wings and fly off to make new homes, following their queens to dry mounds or to build a new. When they have found their new home they drop their wings. In this stage they can be collected, lightly cooked in coals and eaten. As they fall to the ground women collect them to eat because they are nice and sweet. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. When this Jukurrpa story is painted concentric circles are used to represent the ‘mingkirri’ and the rockholes involved in the story, including the central one at Wapurtali (Mt Singleton). Dashes are often depicted around the circles to represent the ‘pamapardu’.


No: 4412/18
Yurrampi Jukurrpa (Honey Ant Dreaming)
Koko: 46 x 30 cm
Jäsenhinta 150 €
Taiteilija:
Wilma Napangardi Poulson

 

Honey ants are a much prized delicacy, considered to be well worth the enormous effort it takes to dig them out of the ground. The ants dig tunnels quite deep under the ground in ‘jirrijirrinpa’ (mulga woodland) country. Branching from these passage ways are chambers (‘mingki’), from the ceiling of which the honey ants are suspended, full of food. With their swollen abdomens, the ants are unable to move. The country associated with this Jukurrpa is Wanakurdpanda, east of Yuendumu. This Jukurrpa also travels through Yuendumu, and belongs to Japangardi/Japanangka men and Napangardi/Napanangka women. Honey ants can be identified by a little yellow stripe on their backs.


No: 1651/18
Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) - Puyurru
Koko: 61 x 46 cm
Jäsenhinta 265 €
Taiteilija:
Melissa Nampijinpa Karpa

 

The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations.


No: 1847/17
Wanakiji Jukurrpa (Bush Tomato Dreaming)
Koko: 61 x 61 cm
Jäsenhinta 345 €
Taiteilija:
Maxine Nungarrayi Tex

 

The Wanakiji Jukurrpa (bush tomato [Solanum chippendalei] Dreaming) travels through Yaturlu (near Mount Theo, north of Yuendumu). “Wanakiji” grows in open spinifex country and is a small, prickly plant with purple flowers that bears green fleshy fruit with many small black seeds. After collecting the fruit the seeds are removed with a small wooden spoon called ‘kajalarra’. The fruit then can be eaten raw or threaded onto skewers called ‘turlturrpa’ and then cooked over a fire. ‘Wanakiji’ can also be skewered and let to dry. When they are prepared in this way it is called ‘turlturrpa’ and the fruit can be kept for a long time. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. The Wanakiji Jukurrpa belongs to Napanangka/Napangardi women and Japanangka/Japangardi men.


No: 2724/18
Wanakiji Jukurrpa (Bush Tomato Dreaming)
Koko: 46 x 46 cm
Jäsenhinta 250 €
Taiteilija:
Melissa Napangardi Williams


 

The Wanakiji Jukurrpa (bush tomato [Solanum chippendalei] Dreaming) travels through Yaturlu (near Mount Theo, north of Yuendumu). “Wanakiji” grows in open spinifex country and is a small, prickly plant with purple flowers that bears green fleshy fruit with many small black seeds. After collecting the fruit the seeds are removed with a small wooden spoon called ‘kajalarra’. The fruit then can be eaten raw or threaded onto skewers called ‘turlturrpa’ and then cooked over a fire. ‘Wanakiji’ can also be skewered and let to dry. When they are prepared in this way it is called ‘turlturrpa’ and the fruit can be kept for a long time. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. The Wanakiji Jukurrpa belongs to Napanangka/Napangardi women and Japanangka/Japangardi men.


 

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